Seminar Programme

Tuesday 26 September

10.00- 10.45

Big Data in Nanotechnology – Marketing Science and Measuring Impact

Big Data in Nanotechnology – Marketing Science and Measuring Impact

Franky Barker, Marketing Science Expert at AZoNetwork

  • The buying process has changed: Whether you are buying a car, a house, or even an OEM sensor for a micro-spectrometer, it all starts with a search.

     As little as 10 years ago you would have gone straight to the estate agent or the car showroom. Nowadays you have all the information you need in the palm of your hand.

     Join us as we discuss how big data and content distribution can be used to measure technology’s impact in an increasingly digital world.

11.00- 11.45

Manufacture of micro/miniature components by FAST sintering and microforming

Manufacture of micro/miniature components by FAST sintering and microforming

Professor Yi Qin, University of Strathclyde

  • There are still significant challenges to the manufacture of miniature and micro-components to meet requirements for multi-materials and multi-functionalities while maintaining low manufacturing-cost. Electrical-field activated sintering technique (FAST) is a technique which could meet the challenges. Existing FAST processes can, however, not be simply scaled down to the manufacture of miniature/micro-components, due to several size-effect related issues to be addressed.

    Micro-FAST  is a process concept scaling down conventional FAST to the micro-scale process (dealing with forming of miniature/micro-sized components) and combining the sintering process with micro-forming to enable shaping components under coupled multi-fields actions and hence, to achieve high-density, near-net-shaped components with higher efficiency. Comparing to other FAST processes, Micro-FAST uses significantly large current density. Due to a small material-volume used, a very high heating rate could be achieved, and a high cooling rate is also achievable with dedicated cooling. Shorter sintering time also suggests consolidation of nanocomposites into bulk-sized components easily achievable while also preserving their nanostructures.

    This invited talk will give an overview on the state of the art of Micro-FAST and then, focus on the progress achieved recently by the University of Strathclyde and its research collaborators, especially on the results obtained through the funded research projects, to be followed by an outlook on the further work, including the challenges to be met in the future.

12.00- 12.45

Pushing the Limits: Micro Molding

Pushing the Limits: Micro Molding

Aaron Johnson, VP of Marketing and Customer Strategy at Accumold

  • This technical presentation, through case study examples, walks through the basics of micro injection molding, what makes it different than traditional molding and explores ways the technology can help design engineers push the limits of development when it comes to size, features and tolerances.

14.00- 14.45

Examples of ALD, CVD and Nanomaterial applications

Examples of ALD, CVD and Nanomaterial applications

Nigel Matthews from Strem Chemicals UK Ltd

  • The presentation will cover the basic principles of ALD, precursors used, delivery systems  together with some example of their use. 

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on the sequential use of a gas phase chemical process. ALD is considered a subclass of chemical vapour deposition. The majority of ALD reactions use two chemicals, typically called precursors.

    ALD has many applications including high dielectric constant material for the electronics industry, barrier films for moisture protection together with a growing interest in the photo voltaic market.

    ALD is an important ant technology with ALD market estimated to be USD 1.4 to 1.5 billion in 2016 (Gartner, VLSI Research, TECHCET), including all segments (e.g. Semi, MEMS, PV, OLED and R&D).

15.00- 15.45

The Future Role of Micro-Nanotechnologies in Industry 4.0

The Future Role of Micro-Nanotechnologies in Industry 4.0

David Tolfree, Vice President of MANCEF

  • The talk will review the current and future role of micro-nanotechnologies in the fields of robotics, autonomous vehicles, 4D printing, artificial intelligence, big data, pervasive sensing, and 5G wireless communication etc. since they are significant drivers of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, known as Industry 4.0.

    One of the industrial goals of Industry 4.0 is factories that will be operated by autonomous robotically-controlled intelligent machines. Artificial intelligence will give machines the ability to re-configure, re-purpose and adapt processes quickly to meet new requirements and changing market needs. Such manufacturing will reduce the time-to-market, improve quality and reliability so will give manufacturers a commercial advantage in the global market place over more traditional manufacturing processes.

Wednesday 27 September

10.00- 10.45

Pushing the Limits: Micro Molding

Pushing the Limits: Micro Molding

Aaron Johnson, VP of Marketing and Customer Strategy at Accumold

  • This technical presentation, through case study examples, walks through the basics of micro injection molding, what makes it different than traditional molding and explores ways the technology can help design engineers push the limits of development when it comes to size, features and tolerances.

11.00- 11.45

Examples of ALD, CVD and Nanomaterial applications

Examples of ALD, CVD and Nanomaterial applications

Nigel Matthews from Strem Chemicals UK Ltd


  • The presentation will cover the basic principles of ALD, precursors used, delivery systems  together with some example of their use. 

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on the sequential use of a gas phase chemical process. ALD is considered a subclass of chemical vapour deposition. The majority of ALD reactions use two chemicals, typically called precursors.

    ALD has many applications including high dielectric constant material for the electronics industry, barrier films for moisture protection together with a growing interest in the photo voltaic market.

    ALD is an important ant technology with ALD market estimated to be USD 1.4 to 1.5 billion in 2016 (Gartner, VLSI Research, TECHCET), including all segments (e.g. Semi, MEMS, PV, OLED and R&D).

12.00 - 12.45

MEMS trench sidewall smoothing by dry plasma HDRF technology

MEMS trench sidewall smoothing by dry plasma HDRF technology

David Lishan, Principal Scientist at Plasma-Therm

  • For decades the semiconductor industry has been focused on Dry etch and deposition technologies, while cleaning was mainly executed by wet technology. Optical devices as well as MOEMS for optical MEMS are required to smooth the sidewall profile of the devices in order to keep good quality of optical characteristics. While the industry is currently using thermal oxidation, dry plasma etching is seen as innovative technology to smooth devices sidewall.

    The presentation will focus on how dry Plasma technology (named HDRF: High Density Radicals Flux) can provide an efficient cleaning solution without damaging sensitive layers like GaN, TiN, and keep low temperature processing.

    In addition, the presentation will focus on HDRF technology’s ability to smooth scalloping after the DRIE Bosch process by keeping the characteristics of MEMS devices, as well as low temperature processing.

14.00 - 14.45

Protecting your ideas - an introduction to intellectual property

Protecting your ideas - an introduction to intellectual property

Oliver Pooley, Patent Attorney at Barker Brettell LLP

  • Protecting your intellectual property does not have to break the bank, but it can break a business: Companies spend a lot of time and effort developing new and innovative products and services. By protecting the ideas behind these products and services, innovators can stop other people taking advantage of their hard work, and give themselves a huge commercial advantage. In this presentation, I will provide a summary to help people understand what can and cannot be protected, when their ideas should be protected and how best to go about this. I will also provide an outline of the way IP can be used to commercialise an idea and generate income, without ever having to resort to costly litigation. I will also provide an outline of recent trends in IP in the high precision manufacturing arena.